What to do AFTER the storm

We know what to do before a typhoon hits, but even after its passing, our safety is still at risk. Find out how to avoid the post-typhoon dangers.
 

Photo taken in Tacloban City during the height of Yolanda crisis.

Photo taken in Tacloban City during the height of Yolanda crisis.


 
From the approximately twenty cyclones that enter the Philippine Area of Responsibility (PAR), eight to nine of these make landfall, possibly causing storm surges, flashfloods, mudflows and landslides.
 
Much has been said about being prepared for a storm’s grand entrance, but our responsibilities on personal safety don’t end there. Once an area is literally taken by storm, we’re often faced with risks such as floods, debris, and power failure. Here’s how we can stay safe.
 
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  • Safety and security come first. After making sure your own family is safe, administer first aid to the injured, and seek medical help if needed. Crisis counseling is advised for those who’ve experienced trauma.
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  • Make sure that the storm has fully passed before going out. Avoid flooded areas, weakened bridges, overhanging structures, damaged buildings, power lines and trees.
     
  • Thoroughly check your home. Watch out for flooded outlets, frayed wires, flammable leaks and animals (e.g. snakes) driven from their dens by high water. Inspect your home before switching the power back on.
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  • Be fire smart. In case of power outage, use flashlights to prevent accidental fire.
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  • Guard against tainted food. Drink and eat food prepared with clean water.
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  • Protect yourself against disease. Apply insect repellant or wear long sleeves, pants and socks to prevent diseases caused by mosquitos.
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  • Document the damage. Take videos or photos of your damaged property covered by insurance.
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  • Notify the authorities about hazards. Call the Sidewalk Clearing Operations Group (SCOG) of the Metropolitan Manila Development Authority (MMDA) at 882-4154 to 74 with local number 317 for the management of uprooted trees and electrical posts.
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    AFTERMATH OF SUPER TYPHOON LAWIN (HAIMA)

     
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Sources: PAGASA, NDRRMC, OCD and MMDA.

Related Video: Are you ready for the next typhoon? Here’s what you need to know.

George Gamayo

George Gamayo

Officer-In-Charge (OIC) at Panahon TV

George Vincent Gamayo is part of the pioneering team of Panahon TV, and a homegrown talent of UBE Media. He was the writer and director of Project DINA (Disaster Information for Nationwide Awareness), a flagship project of the government that teaches the public what to do before, during and after hazards. He also headed our Batang Emergency Response Training (BERT), which gathered over a thousand students and teachers in the National Capital Region (NCR) to educate them on responsible journalism and disaster preparedness. In 2015, the United Nations accredited him to cover and participate in the third World Conference on Disaster Risk Reduction (WCDRR) and the Asia-Pacific Broadcasting Union’s Global News Forum in Sendai, Japan. He also covered the third Media Summit of ABU in Dhaka, Bangladesh in May 2017. Apart from climate change and disaster preparedness content, George also produces golf and cycling stories.